Advocacy Blog

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The ATPE Government Relations Team is hard at work to push issues important for educators and public education in Austin and Washington DC.

Follow our advocacy blog (originally published at www.teachthevote.org) for all the latest education news and information:

 
July 19, 2019

ATPE’s Governmental Relations team is reporting from Houston this week, where hundreds of our members are here for the ATPE Summit and to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Here’s the latest:


ATPE State Officers for 2019-20 took their oath of office at the ATPE Summit in Houston, July 18, 2019.

The ATPE Summit, our annual convention for members, is taking place this week in Houston. On Wednesday, members had an opportunity to hear a legislative update from the ATPE lobbyists, including our Washington-based lobbyist David Pore. Topics of the presentation and a Q&A session that followed included the outcomes of the 2019 legislative session and implementation of the school finance bill, House Bill 3, along with developments related to federal legislation on Social Security. Yesterday, the ATPE House of Delegates met and elected new state officers for the 2019-20 membership year. Delegates also amended and adopted the ATPE Legislative Program, a series of statements reflecting the members’ legislative priorities.


The Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) board of trustees is meeting in Austin this week. Board materials and a link to a livestream of the meeting can found here. During this week’s meeting, the board announced that TRS would distribute the 13th check provided by Senate Bill (SB) 12 this September. ATPE supported SB 12, which along with an infusion of over a billion dollars this session and additional increases in subsequent years brings the TRS trust fund into actuarial soundness. Read additional information and frequently asked questions about SB 12  here. In announcing the plans for issuance of the 13th check in September, TRS Executive Director Brian Guthrie explained that it is important for the agency to cut the check prior to the November board meeting, in case any volatility in the stock market temporarily pushes the fund over the 31-year window within which it is considered actuarially sound.


The Texas Education Agency (TEA) its continuing its video series about this year’s major school finance bill, House Bill (HB) 3. This week’s installment in the informational series focuses on changes to pre-Kindergarten laws under the bill. Check out the latest video and more HB 3 resources here on TEA’s HB 3 website.


July 12, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


Commissioner of Education Mike Morath

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) invited education stakeholders, including ATPE, to a meeting with Commissioner Mike Morath on Monday to go over the agency’s plan for providing public information on the implementation of the tax compression and school finance bill, House Bill (HB) 3. The commissioner walked attendees through a high-level presentation on the various aspects of the 300-page bill that will be enacted over the coming months and years, including subjects related to teacher training and compensation.

The gist is that the agency has created an informational website and will be releasing a new video each week discussing a single topic of HB 3. This week, the agency released a new video detailing changes to the compensatory education allotment, which provides funding for economically disadvantaged students. You can watch that video here. Read your ATPE Governmental Relations team’s full post on Monday’s meeting here.


The Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) board of trustees will be in Austin next week, July 18-19, for a regularly scheduled board meeting. Of note at this particular meeting, the board will decide the timing for delivery of the 13th check that will be delivered to retirees as a result of the passage of Senate Bill (SB) 12. Board materials and a link to a live stream of the meeting can found here.


ATPE is headed to Houston next week for the 2019 Summit, where educators from every corner of Texas will come together, elect ATPE state officers, and set our association’s policy agenda for the next year.

Members will enjoy valuable opportunities to network and make friends with colleagues across the state, as well as learn about important legislation and earn CPE credit. The ATPE Governmental Relations team will be presenting an update on what happened during the 86th legislative session, as well as what you can do to stay engaged and make sure the state follows through on promises made to educators in 2019. ATPE’s Washington, DC-based lobbyist, David Pore, will also participate in the legislative update for members, addressing federal issues of interest to the education community.

If you’ll be attending the ATPE Summit, we look forward to seeing you there!


July 09, 2019

The Texas Education Agency held an information session Monday, July 8, 2019, in which Commissioner of Education Mike Morath briefed education stakeholders, including ATPE’s lobbyists, on various components of House Bill (HB) 3 that will be rolling out over the next several months.

As the session’s major tax compression and school finance bill, HB 3 orders the state and school districts to implement several programmatic changes over the coming months and years. In order to make the process more transparent, TEA has created an HB 3 resource website, which you can view here.

DEEP DIVES

TEA’s website is intended to host a number of “deep dive” updates on various components of HB 3, with a new deep dive posted every week. One of the first is an update on master teacher certifications, which are being phased out as a result of HB 3. The ATPE Governmental Relations team has received several questions about what will happen to teachers who are currently certified as reading masters. The long and short of it is that all master certificates will be converted to “legacy” master certificates and remain valid until their expiration date. Current master teachers should consider whether their underlying certifications are aligned to their current teaching assignments and may reach out to ATPE or TEA with any questions. The official TEA guidance on the subject can be viewed here. The agency’s next deep dive will address compensatory education and is scheduled for release this Thursday, July 11, on the TEA’s HB 3 website. A list of scheduled deep dives can be found here.

SCHOOL FINANCE

The school finance bill should provide additional funding for most districts, worth an average of $635 more per average daily attendance (ADA). Along with the new funding, HB 3 orders school districts to do several things and suggests they do several more. Commissioner Morath conceded to stakeholders Monday that the state has not calculated whether the additional funding schools receive will be enough to do all of what they are being asked, and he indicated that it is likely that roughly 15 school districts will not receive sufficient funding to cover the increase in the educator minimum salary schedule (MSS) mandated under HB 3.

TEACHER PAY

Under HB 3, districts will have the option of accessing a “teacher incentive allotment” if they develop a local program to offer differentiated pay based on teacher quality. This allotment may provide participating districts from $3,000 to $32,000 in additional funding per teacher who qualifies under an approved local program, but it is important to note that this funding will not go directly to the teacher. Instead, that money will go to the district with the requirement that 90 percent of it be spent on compensation for teachers at the participating campus. Schools with existing programs will likely see additional funding in September 2020 for programs in effect during the upcoming school year, and new programs will likely be eligible to receive funding by 2021.

OTHER RULES IMPACTING EDUCATORS

The school finance bill also expanded the “do not hire registry” of public school educators who have been convicted of an inappropriate relationship to non-certified employees. This change is effective immediately, and a deep dive on this topic is scheduled to be released by TEA before the start of the fall semester.

Every teacher in kindergarten through grade 3 must attend a reading academy within the next three years at the school district’s expense. Each academy is expected to include a five-day summer institute, two days of pull-outs, and 12 coaching sessions during the year, plus three days the following summer. Educators will not receive a state stipend for attendance, but the agency indicated there is an expectation that districts will provide them with a stipend. All future K-3 educators will be required to cover the reading academy’s curriculum before placement, which means reading academy instruction will transfer to educator preparation programs (EPPs) going into the future.

New teachers certified for pre-K through grade 6 will also be required to demonstrate proficiency in the science of teaching reading (STR) by January 1, 2021. The agency is currently working on a test for STR proficiency.

OUTCOMES FUNDING

Districts may receive additional outcomes-based funding under HB 3 for each annual graduate above a certain threshold percentage who checks a box indicating they are college, career, or military ready (CCMR). Districts are expected to receive money this year for Class of 2018 graduates.

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONAL DAYS

HB 3 allows schools to add instructional days beyond the current minimum of 180 days up to 210 days. These days will not be subject to compulsory attendance and will be optional at each district’s discretion. The funding will not cover the full cost of operating schools on those days, and the agency acknowledged that many districts may simply use this program to subsidize their existing summer school programs.

You can view the complete slide deck TEA presented to stakeholders on Monday by clicking here. This slide deck includes graphical presentations on many of HB 3’s main components. The agency will continue to produce informational content each week, with compensatory education scheduled for this week and pre-K scheduled for next week. You can see what the agency has already published by clicking on the HB 3 resource page.

July 05, 2019

Teach the Vote is taking a brief hiatus this week, so there will be no week in review blog post today. Our weekly wrap-up will be back next week with the latest news on public education here in Texas. On behalf of the ATPE Governmental Relations team, we hope everyone had a splendid Independence Day and enjoys the weekend!

June 28, 2019

Here’s your weekly wrap-up of education news from the ATPE Governmental Relations team:


On Tuesday, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) launched a new website that will serve as a resource portal for implementation of House Bill 3. In an introductory video, Commissioner of Education Mike Morath explained that TEA will release a series of videos covering different parts of the school finance reform bill. Read more about the new TEA resource in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. To learn more about House Bill 3 and other legislation that passed this year, check out the ATPE lobbyists’ in-depth analysis on Teach the Vote here and here.


In their first meeting since the 86th legislative session adjourned, members of the Pension Review Board (PRB) discussed the implementation of various pieces of pension-related legislation that passed this year. The discussion included a look at bills pertaining to the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) pension fund. There was also a passing of the torch as outgoing Chair Josh McGee ended his term and incoming Chair Stephanie Liebe began hers overseeing the PRB. Read a more detailed review of the PRB meeting in this blog post from ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins.

 


June 27, 2019

The Texas Pension Review Board (PRB) met Thursday, June 27, 2019, in Austin with a focus on reviewing pension-related legislation passed by the 86th Texas Legislature.

Members began by recognizing outgoing Chair Josh McGee, who passes the gavel to new Chair Stephanie Leibe. The PRB governmental relations team then walked the board through a handful of items resulting from the most recent legislative session. The bills include:

  • Senate Bill (SB) 2224 by Sen. Joan Huffman (R-Houston) requires every public retirement system to adopt a written funding policy that details the system’s plan for achieving a funding ratio equal to or greater than 100 percent. Each plan must be submitted to the system’s sponsor and the PRB.
  • SB 322 by Sen. Huffman relates to the evaluation and reporting of investment practices and the performance of certain public retirement systems. Public retirement systems must now include in their annual financial report information about how much investment managers are being paid, as well as hire an independent firm to evaluate the system’s investment practices.
  • SB 12 by Sen. Huffman relates to contributions into and benefits under the Teacher
    Retirement System of Texas (TRS). This bill increases the annual base employer contribution, supplemental employer contribution, and member contribution rates over a five-year period. Certain retired members will also receive a 13th check this year capped at the lesser of the amount of their monthly TRS annuity check check or $2,000.
  • House Bill (HB) 2763 by Rep. Dan Flynn (R-Canton) relates to the police pension fund in certain municipalities.

The agenda book for the current PRB meeting included additional bills related to pensions, such as HB 3. While the school finance bill does not directly address TRS, PRB staff suggest that a significant increase in the salaries of some educators could affect the financial position of TRS over the short term. You can read the full agenda book for today’s meeting here.

PRB Executive Director Anumeha Kumar also explained the agency’s legislatively approved budget, as well as the revised rule review plan for the board. This plan will lay out the process by which the board will review rules for adoption, revision, or repeal.

Staff indicated that as a result of legislation passed this session, the TRS pension’s amortization period is projected to drop from 87 years to under 30 years. This would meet the minimum requirements for being considered actuarially sound and therefore eligible to provide members a cost of living adjustment (COLA). The plan’s amortization period jumped to 87 from 32 last year as a result of the TRS board’s decision to change actuarial assumptions to reflect more conservative economic forecasts.

TRS is by far the largest active plan under the purview of the PRB, with more than $154 billion in assets. The next largest plan, the Texas County & District Retirement System, is worth $30 billion. The PRB briefly mentioned a new resource that is available for members of the public to see a snapshot of the health of the state’s various public pension plans. The Texas Public Pension Data Center can be found here.

June 25, 2019

The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is rolling out a new website and video series to try and explain the various components of House Bill (HB) 3, the major school finance bill passed by the 86th Texas Legislature this year.

At more than 300 pages in length, HB 3 sets in motion a significant number of policy changes that will have marked effects on schools and classrooms. Among these changes is language in the bill that directs school districts that see a substantial increase in school funding as a result of HB 3 to dedicate some of that new funding to increasing compensation for school employees, with priority given to classroom teachers with more than five years of experience.

In the month that passed since HB 3 became law, some districts have awarded raises for school employees, although it’s unclear whether HB 3 was the catalyst. Many districts will await further guidance from TEA before implementing the compensation sections of HB 3 in order to know exactly how they are expected to distribute any new funding and what form the additional compensation may take — i.e. salary, healthcare and retirement contributions, or other benefits that carry a dollar value.

To answer questions like these for the general public, TEA has set up an HB 3 information website that can be found here. The website currently hosts an introductory video by Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath. The agency plans to release a series of 30-minute videos entitled “HB3 in 30,” each of which is intended to explain specific components of HB 3. According to a press release from the agency:

“Videos will be released every Thursday and will be accompanied by supporting documents available for download. A full schedule of weekly release dates, a summary of HB3, frequently asked questions, and implementation guidance for school districts can be found on the TEA House Bill 3 information site.

The first video in the series, an overview of Budget Planning for Teacher Compensation, is scheduled for release on Thursday, June 26.”

Districts will continue to receive formal guidance documents from TEA, the first round of which was released earlier this month. Links to these documents are also provided at the bottom of the HB 3 information site.

For more on the anticipated impact of HB 3, be sure to check out the ATPE Governmental Relations team’s comprehensive analysis of the bill here on Teach the Vote.

June 21, 2019

From Austin to Washington, D.C., here’s a look at the latest advocacy news from your ATPE Governmental Relations team:


Last week, ATPE State President Byron Hildebrand, Vice President Tonja Gray, Executive Director Shannon Holmes, Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter, and ATPE’s Washington-based lobbyist David Pore met with members of the Texas congressional delegation at the U.S. Capitol.

Discussions focused on public education priorities at the federal level, including funding and the repeal of Social Security offsets like the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP). The group also visited with officials at the U.S. Department of Education.

For a full recap of the Washington trip, check out this blog post by Exter.


All bills passed by the Texas legislature are subject to the governor’s veto pen, and Sunday, June 16, 2019, marked the end of the period in which the governor may exercise this power. ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins reports that Gov. Greg Abbott vetoed three education bills that had been finally passed by the 86th Legislature when it adjourned sine die last month.

This year’s vetoed bills included House Bill (HB) 109 by Rep. Armando Martinez (D-Weslaco), which would have required charter schools to give students Memorial Day off as school districts are currently required to do, yet the bill exempted districts of innovation (DOI). Gov. Abbott explained in his veto message that the bill would have exempted up to 859 school districts, and suggested the legislature draft more targeted legislation in the future.

The governor also vetoed HB 455 by Rep. Alma Allen (D-Houston), which would have required the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to develop a model policy on recess that encourages age-appropriate outdoor physical activities. Despite praising the bill’s good intentions, the governor called HB 455 “bureaucracy for bureaucracy’s sake.”

Additionally, Gov. Abbott vetoed HB 3511 by Rep. Gary VanDeaver (R-New Boston), which would have created a “Commission on Texas Workforce of the Future.” The governor called the bill redundant and duplicative of work being done by the Tri-Agency Workforce Initiative, which involves the Texas Workforce Commission, TEA, and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB).

Incidentally, the Texas governor has “line-item” veto authority over the budget, and governors have often exercised this power to strike the funding from programs of which they disapprove. Gov. Abbott raised eyebrows this year by declining to veto any lines from the state budget, allowing all of the provisions of HB 1 to go into effect without opposition.

For a complete look at the education bills that passed this session, be sure to check out our 86th Legislative Session Highlights here on Teach the Vote penned by the ATPE staff lobbyists who worked on these and hundreds of other bills throughout the 140-day session.


 

June 19, 2019

Most education policy happens at the state level, but there are a few issues that are important to educators and  students that are decided by officials in Washington. That is why ATPE maintains a federal lobby presence. While the main ATPE lobby team works year-round here in Texas, lobbyist David Pore also represents our organization in Washington, DC to ensure that ATPE members have the best representation at all levels of government.

ATPE’s Tonja Gray, Monty Exter, and Byron Hildebrand at the U.S. Capitol

In addition to David’s work year-round on behalf of ATPE members, the association also sends a delegation up to Washington at least once a year to promote our federal priorities. This year ATPE State President Byron Hildebrand, Vice President Tonja Gray, Executive Director Shannon Holmes, and Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter made the journey during the week of June 10, 2019.

While in DC, the ATPE group met with key members of the Texas congressional delegation, as well as committee staff and officials with the US Department of Education. We discussed a handful of topics important to ATPE members including our support for the repeal of the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) and Government Pension Offset (GPO) that reduce many educators’ Social Security benefits; the need for increased Title I and Title II funding; and our opposition to federal voucher programs.

ATPE meeting with Rep. Kevin Brady’s staff in Washington, DC

ATPE has been working with Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), former chairman of the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee, on legislation to repeal and replace the WEP. Now the ranking member of the committee, Brady is working with the current committee chairman, Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.), to reintroduce the bipartisan bill during the current congress.

In addition to meeting with Rep. Brady and his staff, ATPE met with Chairman Neal’s committee staff and with Rep. Jodey Arrington (R–Texas) who represents the Lubbock area and sits on the Social Security Subcommittee of the Ways and Means Committee. ATPE State Vice President Tonja Gray is a constituent of Arrington, who has become a real champion for WEP reform in Congress. We rounded out our meetings with members of the Texas delegation on the Ways and Means Committee with Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D–Texas), who represents the greater Austin area.

Rep. Jodey Arrington with ATPE’s Tonja Gray in Washington, DC

Texas also has three new members of Congress now serving on the Education Subcommittee of the U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor. They are Reps. Joaquin Castro (D–Texas) from the San Antonio area, Ron Wright (R-Texas) from Arlington, and Van Taylor (R-Texas) out of Plano. We spoke to each of these members about the importance of maintaining educator preparation funding in Title II as a part of the pending reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, as well as increasing or at least maintaining formula funding for Title I. As a Title I funded interventionist, Tonja Gray was able to put a personal touch on ATPE’s message.

ATPE’s Byron Hildebrand and Tonja Gray with Rep. Henry Cuellar in Washington, DC

Along with expressing support for funding, we also spoke to each of these members of the Texas delegation about ATPE’s staunch opposition to federal voucher legislation. If the House were to take up any of the Senate’s voucher bills, such a measure would likely be heard in the Education Subcommittee.

ATPE meetings with U.S. Senators John Cornyn (R) and Ted Cruz were also productive. Sen. Cornyn’s staff ensured ATPE not only that Title I and II funding are likely to be maintained or increased, but also that there would be no attempts in the current budget cycle to block grant Title I funding. ATPE opposes block granting Title I funding because it would likely result in the dilution of Title I dollars currently delivered through a formula to the campuses with the highest concentrations of disadvantaged students (those eligible for free and reduced lunch).

Our conversation with Sen. Cruz focused largely on the WEP legislation. Sen. Cruz carried the Senate companion to the Brady bill during the last congress and is planning to pick up the Brady/Neal bill again as soon as it is refiled in the House. The senator is currently seeking a Democratic co-sponsor to ensure that the bill has bipartisan authorship in both chambers.

Altogether, ATPE’s 2019 trip to the nation’s capital was very productive and yielded excellent news. As developments continue on ATPE’s federal priorities, we will report those updates here on Teach the Vote.

June 14, 2019

Here’s a look at this week’s education news from ATPE Governmental Relations:


This week, Gov. Greg Abbott signed the school finance and property tax reform bill, House Bill (HB) 3, into law. This bill modifies how public schools are funded and attempts to shift some of the burden of paying for public education that has fallen heavily on the shoulders of local property taxpayers closer toward a balance point with the portion financed by the state. The bill also affects teacher compensation. Read a recap of the governor’s signing ceremony, as well as links to our analysis of what HB 3 does, in this blog post by ATPE Lobbyist Andrea Chevalier.

Gov. Abbott also signed Senate Bill (SB) 12 into law on the same day. The bill improves funding for the state’s pension system for educators. As a result of the bill’s signing this week, the Teacher Retirement System (TRS) expects a 13th check to be sent to retirees this fall, with a more specific date to be discussed at the TRS board’s next meeting in July.

Stay tuned to Teach the Vote for updates as this legislation is implemented, and don’t forget to check out ATPE’s full recap of all the education legislation that passed this session.


ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes discussed HB 3 with CBS Austin.

Speaking of HB 3, your ATPE lobbyists have been busy taking to the airwaves over the last two weeks to talk about the bill and its consequences for school finance and teacher pay.

ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes joined state Rep. James Talarico (D-Round Rock) and Austin education leaders on CBS Austin to take part in an hour-long panel on school finance last week. You can watch the entire panel’s discussion here on the CBS Austin website.

Also discussing HB 3 on TV and radio programs this week was ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins. He joined the statewide politics program Capital Tonight on Spectrum News this week to discuss how teacher compensation is affected by the bill. You can watch the segment here on the Spectrum News website.


The State Board of Education (SBOE) met this week in Austin, where a handful of applications for new charter schools came under scrutiny. On Thursday, a board committee voted to exercise the board’s statutory authority to veto four of the five proposed new charters. Members expressed concerns over the fiscal impact, qualifications of the applicants, and accuracy of the applications. On Friday, the full board reversed course and voted to approve the new applications with one notable exception. Members voted 8-5 to reject the application for a new charter by the founder of Harmony Public Schools. Read ATPE Lobbyist Mark Wiggins’s recap of Friday’s SBOE meeting here.

Commissioner of Education Mike Morath also updated the board this week on legislation passed by the 86th Texas Legislature that will affect public education, including HB 3 and changes to the STAAR assessment. Several of the education bills that passed this session will also require rulemaking by the commissioner before they can be fully implemented. Read a recap of the commissioner’s comments here.



A group of ATPE state officers and lobbyists were in Washington, DC this week to discuss federal education issues with elected officials and their staffs. ATPE State President Byron Hildebrand and Vice President Tonja Gray were accompanied by ATPE Executive Director Shannon Holmes and Senior Lobbyist Monty Exter on the fly-in, which was organized by ATPE’s longtime Washington-based lobbyist David Pore.

Issues discussed included education funding and the repeal of Social Security offsets like the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) that negatively impact educators and other public servants throughout the country. Stay tuned to our Teach the Vote blog next week for a complete report on these ATPE meetings in the nation’s capital.

If you are an ATPE member who’ll be attending the ATPE Summit in July, make plans to attend our legislative update session where the lobby team will brief members on these federal issues and the results of the recent Texas legislative session.